Piper Report
Blog on Medicare, Medicaid, health reform, and more. Insights and resources on hot issues. Kip Piper, editor.
Healthcare consultant, speaker, and writer. Expert on Medicare, Medicaid, health reform, and pharma, biotech, and medical technology industries. President, Health Results Group LLC. Senior advisor to Sellers Dorsey, TogoRun, and Fleishman-Hillard. Visit KipPiper.com. Or email Kip here.
Cartoon

American Flag

posted: April 5, 2006

Part%20D%20Risk%20Mitigation.jpgBeing a Medicare prescription drug plan can be a profitable business. For the smart players, it will be highly profitable over time and indispensable to market position. But Medicare Part D can also be financially risky and volatile - particularly given:


  • Complexities of the Medicare population
  • Inherent uncertainties of a radically new and complex government program
  • Vagaries of drug pricing and utilization management
  • Stiff competition among plans
  • Multitude of benefit designs
  • High start-up costs
  • Inexperience of some of the players
  • Unpredictable enrollment (aggregate and mix)


    That’s why Medicare Part D includes three separate mechanisms to mitigate the financial risks of Medicare drug plans. The mechanisms created under the Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) - risk corridors, risk adjustment, and federal reinsurance - apply to both the stand-alone Prescription Drug Plans (PDPs) and the Medicare Advantage prescription drug plans (MA-PDs).


    Each of the three methods mitigates different kinds of risk. While they help stabilize the drug plan market and facilitate market entry, they also benefit Part D enrollees in important, sometimes subtle ways.


    Risk Corridors for Profit and Loss:


    Using a system of risk corridors that compares actual incurred drug benefit costs to estimated costs submitted in bids, Medicare limits the profits and losses of Part D drug plans.


    Specifically, if a Medicare drug plan’s actual benefit costs exceed expected (bid) levels by a sufficient degree, the plan will receive an additional federal payment to cover a portion of the loss. However, if a drug plan’s actual spending falls sufficiently below projections, the plan must share some of the profit with the feds. Risk corridors apply to actual and expected drug benefits costs but exclude plan administrative costs and federal reinsurance payments.


    Risk corridors partially protect prescription drug plans from dramatic changes in drug spending, including the unexpected cost of new medications. Estimating per capita drug costs is also tough, particularly for a brand new benefit of unprecedented size and complexity. Therefore, the corridor mechanism also helps protect drug plans from this uncertainty.


    Here’s how it works. After each contract year, CMS will would compare each drug plan’s expected and actual benefit costs. The thresholds (when the mechanism kicks in) and the proportions of profit and loss shared vary.


    For 2006 and 2007, Medicare drug plans will bear all gains and losses that fall within 2.5 percent of their expected costs. If costs differ from expectations by more than 2.5 percent but less than 5 percent, the risk corridor payment will cover 75 percent of the amount in that range. If actual and expected costs differ by more than 5 percent, the risk corridor payment will cover 75 percent of the amount between 2.5 percent and 5 percent and 80 percent of the amount in excess of 5 percent. If a sufficient number of plans serving a substantial majority of enrollees receive risk corridor payments for a given year, the feds will cover 90 percent of costs falling within the corridor (instead of 75 percent).


    For 2008 through 2011, the risk corridor thresholds will double. The assumption is that by then the private drug plans will have sufficient experience in bidding and projecting costs. Specifically, the 2.5 percent factor goes to 5 percent and 5 percent is replaced by 10 percent. Within these new, wider corridors, the federal share covered by the risk corridors drops from 75 percent to 50 percent. For cost deviations exceeding 10 percent, the federal share will remain at 80 percent.


    For contract years 2012 and beyond, CMS has the authority to further increase the risk corridor thresholds provided they are structured symmetrically.


    Risk Adjustment:


    Risk adjustment is designed to adjust a drug plan’s monthly premium from the government to account for differences in beneficiaries’ expected drug spending. The adjustment methodology is based on a few readily available factors - notably age, sex, and health status. While not perfect predictors by any means, these factors are reasonably effective in grouping large numbers of beneficiaries in terms of likely relative differences in expected drug spending.


    Using the risk adjustment factor applied prospectively to the federal share of the plan’s monthly premium, CMS pays Medicare drug plans more for sicker beneficiaries who are expected to incur higher drug costs and less for healthier enrollees who are expected to have lower drug spending. (For most Part D enrollees, taxpayers subsidize 75 percent of drug plan premiums, with enrollees paying the other 25 percent. For dual eligibles, federal and state taxpayers pay 100 percent of the premium. For benies who qualify for the low-income subsidy, the federal share of the premium varies from 75-100 percent based on a sliding scale.)


    Like risk adjustment systems used elsewhere in Medicare and Medicaid, the Part D risk adjustment mechanism is intended to vary the federal share of premiums based on factors that are beyond the control of the drug plan. That is, given the widely varying prescription drug needs of the Medicare population, it helps mitigate the risk of adverse selection.


    Risk adjustment will also help protect beneficiaries with high drug needs by increasing federal subsidies. And low cost, healthier enrollees are protected from paying higher premiums if they happen to select a drug plan with a disproportionate number of sicker members.


    Federal Reinsurance:


    Federal reinsurance payments to Medicare drug plans will kick in when an enrollee’s actual drug spending reaches Part D’s annual catastrophic threshold (commonly called the “doughnut hole”). For Part D beneficiaries who are not dual eligibles or receiving the low-income subsidy, Federal taxpayers will cover 95 percent of any drug costs above the doughnut hole ($5,100 in 2006). (Dual eligibles and benies qualifying for low-income subsidy pay only nominal co-payments [$2-$5]. As a result, federal reinsurance is effectively 100 percent.)


    Paid to the drug plans on a retrospective basis, federal reinsurance payments will serve to limit the risk that plans face in serving the highest-cost beneficiaries. Because a plan’s costs of providing drug coverage above the catastrophic threshold will likely correlate with fluctuations of average drug prices and utilization patterns, reinsurance payments should also provide plans with some protection against uncertainty about future drug costs. However, because reinsurance is retrospective by nature, the mechanism will not address the financial risks involved in providing the front-end portion of the benefit.

  • e-mail this entry







    Consider This
    In ancient China, physicians were paid only when their patients were kept well and often not paid if the patient got sick. If a patient died, a special lantern was hung outside the doctor's house. Upon each death, another lantern was added. This is the first known use of the two most powerful drivers for health care performance - incentives and transparency.
    Our Staff
    Kevin 'Kip' Piper
    Kip Piper
    Editor

    Watson the Dog
    Watson Piper
    Managing Editor

    Healthcare Consultant
    President of Health Results Group LLC. Senior counselor with Fleishman-Hillard, the top public relations and communications consultancy. Senior consultant with Sellers Dorsey, influential Medicaid and health reform consultancy. Senior counselor, TogoRun, leading advisors in health care public affairs.

    Expertise
    Leading authority on Medicare, Medicaid, and health reform. Specialist in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device, and health plan industry issues. Policy, finance, coverage, reimbursement, health and drug benefits, marketing, business development, innovation, and public affairs.

    Strategic Advisor
    Advised Fortune 100 companies, pharma and biotech firms, medical device firms, top federal officials, governors, members of Congress, foundations, and foreign leaders. Skilled, creative business and policy strategist and problem solver.

    Speaker
    Popular speaker at health industry conferences. Topics include Medicare, pharma business issues, Medicaid reform, coverage and reimbursement, and health innovation. Keynotes, seminars, and briefings.

    Thought Leader
    Testified before Congressional committees, negotiated major legislation, led groundbreaking programs, and designed and implemented numerous health innovations.

    Blogger
    Editor of the Piper Report, a leading health care blog with thousands of regular readers. Medicare, Medicaid, pharma, biotech, and more. News, advice, solutions, and resources.

    Writer
    Upcoming books include Medicare and Medicaid from A to Z and MediStrategy: Medicare and Medicaid Business Strategies.

    Editor
    Business and policy editor of American Health & Drug Benefits, peer reviewed journal for decision makers in health plans, drug plans, PBMs, CMS, states, and large employers, with circulation of 30,000.

    Learn More
    To learn more, please visit Kip at www.kippiper.com.
    linked-in.gif
    Syndicate Piper Report